Maggs Counterculture

Ask me anything   Sold stock graveyard, laboratory, visual indulgence, events, catalogues, book launches, gallery shows, some discussion.

lashtalcom:

fraterpuck:

Jimmy Page and William Burroughs discuss magick and eat burritos, 1975

JP and WSB

lashtalcom:

fraterpuck:

Jimmy Page and William Burroughs discuss magick and eat burritos, 1975

JP and WSB

— 2 months ago with 9 notes
Anti-Atomic student protest poster

Anti-Atomic student protest poster

— 6 months ago

Shaky Nokia phone footage  taken in Paris 2008, at ‘Chambre des Cauchemars’ the Crowley painting show. Kenneth Anger on the significance of Anton Szandor La Vey’s cameo appearance in ‘Invocation of My Demon Brother. 

— 7 months ago

Kenneth Anger on Stage on Aleister Crowley in Paris 

— 7 months ago

Paul McCartney’s wrapping paper for Indica (the gallery/bookshop not Cannabis Indica). 
If more people knew of their existence, these should be very sought after bits of paper, fine examples of the vibrant crossover between art, Pop culture, counterculture. rock ‘n’ roll and public life in sixties London. This blogger is aware of one example each in the private collections of two individuals, one a dealer and the other a ’60s person of note.  
 
Miles has recounted in print how McCartney “On the day the bookshop opened.. pulled up in his Aston Martin and heaved an enormous package from the back seat. he had designed and hand-lettered the wrapping paper for the shop: stark black letters on rather high quality white paper.As soon as the American fan magazines heard about this we began to get requests for it from American fans, all enclosing useless -to us- American stamps” (p161 Barry Miles -London Calling, 2010).
In conversation with this blogger, Barry Miles scoffed at the idea that the paper is rare, citing the 10, 000 or more leaves that were probably printed. Surely though, much was used for a variety of purposes besides wrapping books and art and the gallery was named after a drug, making it ideal for underground medical purposes. Wrapping paper is rarely kept and especially in such good condition. 
Indica The Gallery (Barry Miles ran the bookshop half) was set up by John Dunbar to show the kinetic trend, and conceptual work and the art of the happening. Artists included Yoko Ono, Lillian Lijn, Mark Boyle, Takis and Carlos Cruz-Diez.

 

Paul McCartney’s wrapping paper for Indica (the gallery/bookshop not Cannabis Indica).

If more people knew of their existence, these should be very sought after bits of paper, fine examples of the vibrant crossover between art, Pop culture, counterculture. rock ‘n’ roll and public life in sixties London. This blogger is aware of one example each in the private collections of two individuals, one a dealer and the other a ’60s person of note. 

 

Miles has recounted in print how McCartney “On the day the bookshop opened.. pulled up in his Aston Martin and heaved an enormous package from the back seat. he had designed and hand-lettered the wrapping paper for the shop: stark black letters on rather high quality white paper.As soon as the American fan magazines heard about this we began to get requests for it from American fans, all enclosing useless -to us- American stamps” (p161 Barry Miles -London Calling, 2010).

In conversation with this blogger, Barry Miles scoffed at the idea that the paper is rare, citing the 10, 000 or more leaves that were probably printed. Surely though, much was used for a variety of purposes besides wrapping books and art and the gallery was named after a drug, making it ideal for underground medical purposes. Wrapping paper is rarely kept and especially in such good condition.

Indica The Gallery (Barry Miles ran the bookshop half) was set up by John Dunbar to show the kinetic trend, and conceptual work and the art of the happening. Artists included Yoko Ono, Lillian Lijn, Mark Boyle, Takis and Carlos Cruz-Diez.

 

— 7 months ago with 7 notes
Early bandit poetry

Anon., 1100-1500 (Middle English Lyrics and Ballads) :  THE NOBLE FISHERMAN, OR, ROBIN HOOD’S PREFERMENT [from The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (1882-1898)]

1 

1



1   In summer time, when leaves grow green, 
2      When they doe grow both green and long, 
3   Of a bould outlaw, calld Robin Hood, 
4      It is of him I sing this song. 

2



5   When the lilly leafe and the elephant 
6      Doth bud and spring with a merry good cheere, 
7   This outlaw was weary of the wood-side, 
8      And chasing of the fallow deere. 

3



9   ‘The fishermen brave more mony have 
10      Then any merchant, two or three; 
11   Therefore I will to Scarborough goe, 
12      That I a fisherman brave may be.’ 

[Page 212 ] 



4



13   This outlaw calld his merry men all, 
14      As they sate under the green-wood tree: 
15   ‘If any of you have gold to spend, 
16      I pray you heartily spend it with me. 

5



17   ‘Now,’ quoth Robin, ‘I’le to Scarborough goe, 
18      It seemes to be a very faire day;’ 
19   Who tooke up his inne at a widdow-womans house, 
20      Hard by upon the water gray. 

6



21   Who asked of him, Where wert thou borne? 
22      Or tell to me, where dost thou fare? 
23   ‘I am a poore fisherman,’ saith he then, 
24      ’This day intrapped all in care.’ 

7



25   ‘What is thy name, thou fine fellow? 
26      I pray thee heartily tell to me;’ 
27   ‘In mine own country where I was borne, 
28      Men called me Simon over the Lee.’ 

8



29   ‘Simon, Simon,’ said the good wife, 
30      ’I wish thou maist well brook thy name;’ 
31   The outlaw was ware of her courtesie, 
32      And rejoycd he had got such a dame. 

9



33   ‘Simon, wilt thou be my man? 
34      And good round wages I’le give thee; 
35   I have as good a ship of mine owne 
36      As any sayle upon the sea. 

10



37   ‘Anchors and planks thou shalt want none, 
38      Masts and ropes that are so long;’ 
39   ‘And if that you thus furnish me,’ 
40      Said Simon, ‘nothing shall goe wrong.’ 

11



41   They pluckt up anchor, and away did sayle, 
42      More of a day then two or three; 
43   When others cast in their baited hooks, 
44      The bare lines into the sea cast he. 

12



45   ‘It will be long,’ said the master then, 
46      ’Ere this great lubber do thrive on the sea; 
47   I’le assure you he shall have no part of our fish, 
48      For in truth he is of no part worthy.’ 

13



49   ‘O woe is me,’ said Simon then, 
50      ’This day that ever I came here! 
51   I wish I were in Plomton Parke, 
52      In chasing of the fallow deere. 

14



53   ‘For every clowne laughs me to scorne, 
54      And they by me set nought at all; 
55   If I had them in Plomton Park, 
56      I would set as little by them all.’ 

15



57   They pluckt up anchor, and away did sayle, 
58      More of a day then two or three; 
59   But Simon spied a ship of warre, 
60      That sayld towards them most valourously. 

16



61   ‘O woe is me,’ said the master then, 
62      ’This day that ever I was borne! 
63   For all our fish we have got to-day 
64      Is every bit lost and forlorne. 

17



65   ‘For your French robbers on the sea, 
66      They will not spare of us one man, 
67   But carry us to the coast of France, 
68      And ligge us in the prison strong.’ 

18



69   But Simon said, Doe not feare them, 
70      Neither, master, take you no care; 
71   Give me my bent bow in my hand, 
72      And never a Frenchman will I spare. 

19



73   ‘Hold thy peace, thou long lubber, 
74      For thou art nought but braggs and boast; 
75   If I should cast the over-board, 
76      There were nothing but a lubber lost.’ 

20



77   Simon grew angry at these words, 
78      And so angry then was he 
79   That he tooke his bent bow in his hand, 
80      And to the ship-hatch goe doth he. 

21



81   ‘Master, tye me to the mast,’ saith he, 
82      ’That at my mark I may stand fair, 
83   And give me my bended bow in my hand, 
84      And never a Frenchman will I spare.’ 

22



85   He drew his arrow to the very head, 
86      And drew it with all might and maine, 
87   And straightway, in the twinkling of an eye, 
88      Doth the Frenchmans heart the arow gain. 

23



89   The Frenchman fell downe on the ship-hatch, 
90      And under the hatches down below; 
91   Another Frenchman that him espy’d 
92      The dead corps into the sea doth throw. 

24



93   ‘O master, loose me from the mast,’ he said, 
94      ’And for them all take you no care, 
95   And give me my bent bow in my hand, 
96      And never a Frenchman will I spare.’ 

[Page 213 ] 



25



97   Then streight [they] did board the Frenchmans ship, 
98      They lying all dead in their sight; 
99   They found within the ship of warre 
100      Twelve thousand pound of money bright. 

26



101   ‘The one halfe of the ship,’ said Simon then, 
102      ’I’le give to my dame and children small; 
103   The other halfe of the ship I’le bestow 
104      On you that are my fellowes all.’ 

27



105   But now bespake the master then, 
106      For so, Simon, it shall not be; 
107   For you have won her with your own hand, 
108      And the owner of it you shall bee. 

28



109   ‘It shall be so, as I have said; 
110      And, with this gold, for the opprest 
111   An habitation I will build, 
112      Where they shall live in peace and rest.’ 




NOTES

^ [Editorial note 1
a. Wood, 402, p. 18. b. Wood, 401, leaf 25 b. c. Garland of 1663, No 12. d. Garland of 1670, No 11. e. Rawlinson, 566. f. Pepys, II, 108, No 95. g. Pepys, II, 123, No 108.
— 8 months ago
File card of a day Labourer imprisoned by Franco regime.

File card of a day Labourer imprisoned by Franco regime.

— 8 months ago